Tag Archives: Norway

The only way is Norway! Reflections on SCAPE 2017

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It’s been a busy few days of science, eating great Norwegian food, catching up with old friends, and meeting new ones:  The Scandinavian Association for Pollination Ecology’s 31st annual meeting is over.  As I’ve reported in previous years – for example here and here and here –  it’s been a whirlwind of great presentations and interesting discussions, far too much to summarise in a single blog post.  But here’s my top 5 personal list of things that I discovered during SCAPE 2017:

  • The hills are alive with microclimatic heterogeneity!  Lisa-Maria Ohler introduced us to how variable ground temperature can be on a very local scale and how this might influence plant-pollinator diversity.  Especially impressive was the fact that this was based on Lisa’s BSc thesis!

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  • Removal of abundant and well connected plant species (“hubs”) from a plant-pollinator network can affect insect visitation rates and pollen deposition (Paolo Biella).  It was particularly good to catch up with this project as I’m one of the collaborators on it!

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  • Several very interesting talks discussed scent variation between Lithophragma populations and how this does not seem to correlate with flower shape and with the moth and bee pollinators, including this one by Mia Waters:

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  • Some invasive plants have much higher levels of pollen protein content than native plants which may be a reason why they are so successful – they attract more pollen-collecting visitors (Laura Russo).
  • Old ideas of why heteranthery (flowers with two different types of anthers) have evolved may not be correct (Kathleen Kay).  This is a question that vexed Darwin and still seems to be vexing pollination ecologists!

I also got some really useful ideas and feedback on my own presentation, which is one of the best things about small conferences such as SCAPE: just over 70 people took part.  Next year will mark a break in tradition for SCAPE when, for the first time in its history, the 32nd meeting will take place outside of Scandinavia, in Ireland.  Watch this space for more details next year!

Thanks to our Norwegian hosts for making the conference so welcoming; I’ll finish with some general photos of the conference and of the lovely town of Drøbak, where the meeting took place, and its aquarium:

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The 31st Annual Meeting of the Scandinavian Association for Pollination Ecology (SCAPE 2017) – registration closes 15th September

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SCAPE is my favourite annual conference by a long margin: small, friendly, welcoming (especially for Master’s and PhD students, and postdocs), and packed full of great science.  It’s the longest-running annual conference of its kind in the world and this year the 31st meeting takes place in Norway; registration closes on 15th September – here’s the link for more information.

So if you are a scientist with an interest in pollination ecology, in all of its varied expressions, consider coming along.  I’ve written a short history of SCAPE here, and these are some links to previous meetings to give you a sense of what to expect:

https://jeffollerton.wordpress.com/2016/10/15/i-want-to-see-the-bright-lights-tonight-the-30th-annual-scape-conference-part-1/

https://jeffollerton.wordpress.com/2015/10/25/scape-day-3-science-on-a-sunday/

https://jeffollerton.wordpress.com/2014/10/27/dancing-with-wolves-more-from-scape-2014/

https://jeffollerton.wordpress.com/2012/11/07/the-great-escape/

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Spiral Sunday #23 – a granite spiral from Norway

2012-10-27 14.28.28I took this week’s Spiral Sunday photograph at a small sculpture park in an old quarry on the coastal path on Kirkøy (Hvaler) in Norway when we were attending the SCAPE 2012 conference in Skjærhalden.

If I recall correctly it was late afternoon and there was a wonderful low light on the stones, hard shadows sharpening the carved edges of the sculptures.  It was magical to come across these sculptures unexpectedly on a long circular hike; I’d recommend a visit if you are in the area.

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Filed under Biodiversity and culture, spirals