Tag Archives: International Botanical Congress

Highlights from Monday at the International Botanical Congress

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On the way in to the congress venue yesterday morning I spotted a small yellow bird lying dead on the street; turned out to be a Japanese White-eye, a first for me.  Can I count dead birds on my life list?

The scientific programme for the day got off to a great start with a keynote by Michael Donoghue on the value of model lineages for really exploring plant evolution in depth.  He focused on the work of his group on the genus Viburnum, and it has a masterclass in presenting a lot of complex work in an engaging and contextual way, telling a great story.

These photos tell you about the scale of these keynotes and the need for video feeds of the presentation.  It’s all working well though:

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In the afternoon things got a little more intimate when the themed symposia started.  For now I’ve decided not to try to move between sessions to cherry pick talks I really want to hear and instead stick with the single sessions.  The first of these was on “Pollination by non-flying mammals” and a series of speakers outlined some of the diversity of these animals and how flowers are adapted to be pollinated by them.  As camera traps have become more widely used, especially at night using infra red lighting, the range of mammals known to pollinate flowers has increased and now includes species such as genets and elephant shrews.  The latter wins the prize for outrageous cuteness!  Check out some of the images of these pollinators at this BBC site.

That session ended at 3.30pm and there was just time to chat to a few people and grab a quick coffee before I was speaking at 4.00pm in the “Evolution of floral traits” session, in a vast hall that seemed mainly empty but actually probably had a couple of hundred people in it:

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My talk was on “Spatio-temporal stability of an island endemic plant-pollinator interaction involving floral colour change”. It seemed to be well received though in retrospect I probably focused too much on the pollinator side of what’s happening in our Tenerife study system.  The talks that came after were a great mix of scales and approaches but by 6.00pm the jetlag had caught up with me and I couldn’t stop myself falling asleep towards the end of a fascinating talk by Adam Roddy (sorry Adam!)  That was bad enough: then I started snoring and was jerked awake when Kathleen Kay punched me (thank’s Kathleen!)  Oh the science shame….

Much chatting afterwards then whisked off to dinner by some Chinese and American colleagues, in the fanciest hotel I’ve ever seen: we were met out of the lift by a gaggle of singing waitresses…. A very pleasant evening.  Back to the hotel by 9.30pm, for a beer and some tv, but could hardly keep my eyes open.  Slept until 6.00am – huzzah – jetlag seems to be over!  Now to breakfast and the start of a new day.  Must finish writing my talk for Saturday though….

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Feeding of the 7000 – the International Botanical Congress steps up a gear

So it turns out that the figure of 6000 delegates at the International Botanical Congress was wrong: it’s actually almost 7000!  The official figure is 6,953 people from “109 countries and regions” [not quite sure what that means].  There are 3,519 talks scheduled to be given by scientists from 85 countries: botany is such an incredibly international venture!  But then you can say that about all of the sciences.

Yesterday the IBC stepped up a gear with some public lectures in the afternoon.  I managed to catch the one by Steve Blackmore on why greening of  cities is so important, and the role of plants in improving urban living through microclimate modification, food production, aesthetic enhancement, etc.  Couldn’t agree more and it’s a recurring theme in the IBC’s exhibition centre.  The Chinese take this very seriously and Shenzhen has some lovely planting and green spaces; I hope to post more images about this later in the week but here’s one example I snapped on the way to the venue yesterday morning:

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The other talk I saw was by the venerable Peter Raven, now in his 80s but still going strong and an inspiration to all of us youngsters 🙂  The theme of Peter’s talk was “Saving plants to save ourselves”, and the importance of the plant sciences for sustaining the Earth in the face of exponential population growth:

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Peter introduced the “Shenzhen Declaration” –  an open letter or manifesto that challenges international governments to take the plant sciences seriously and provides something of a road map for how that can be done.  More on the Declaration in a later post.

At 6pm there was a welcoming reception to which all delegates were invited; simply getting that many people into one of the halls was a triumph of logistics, but they were also fed and able to drink as much as they wanted, all for free.  Quite a feat to pull off; this shot was taken fairly early on in the proceedings; there was more than twice that number behind me:

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Some more photos from the venue, starting with part of the main display about Chinese conservation.  Not sure that a couple of stuffed pandas sends quite the right message, but who am I to quibble:

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A behind-the-scenes shot of just part of the registration desk area:

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The IBC is the only conference I’ve attended that has a SWAT team with automatic weapons, attack dogs, and riot shields on constant standby.  You can just see some of them at the back of this shot, about as close as I dared photograph…..:

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No conference is complete without an irritating robot giving out information in a cutesy, high pitched voice:

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So the main scientific programme starts today; I’ll be going to a couple of the keynote lectures in the morning, then there’s a session after lunch on “Pollination by non-flying mammals” that I’m looking forward to.  I’m then speaking at 4pm in the session on “Evolution of floral traits”, discussing some of the work that we have been doing in Tenerife.  Wish me luck!

The session I’m talking in ends at 6pm.  I’m still jet lagged and have been up since 4am so at that point I’ll be ready for a beer and some food!

 

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