Get a 30% discount if you pre-order my new book Pollinators & Pollination: Nature and Society

PollinatorsandPollination-frontcover

In the next few months my new book Pollinators & Pollination: Nature and Society will be published.  As you can imagine, I’m very excited! The book is currently available to pre-order: you can find full details here at the Pelagic Publishing website.  If you do pre-order it you can claim a 30% discount by using the pre-publication offer code POLLINATOR.

As with my blog, the book is aimed at a very broad audience including the interested public, gardeners, conservationists, and scientists working in the various sub-fields of pollinator and pollination research. The chapter titles are as follows:

Preface and Acknowledgements
1. The importance of pollinators and pollination
2. More than just bees: the diversity of pollinators
3. To be a flower
4. Fidelity and promiscuity in Darwin’s entangled bank
5. The evolution of pollination strategies
6. A matter of time: from daily cycles to climate change
7. Agricultural perspectives
8. Urban environments
9. The significance of gardens
10. Shifting fates of pollinators
11. New bees on the block
12. Managing, restoring and connecting habitats
13. The politics of pollination
14. Studying pollinators and pollination
References
Index

 

 

5 Comments

Filed under Bees, Biodiversity, Biodiversity and culture, Birds, Butterflies, Climate change, Ecosystem services, Evolution, Flies, Gardens, History of science, Honey bees, Hoverflies, IPBES, Macroecology, Mammals, Moths, Mutualism, Neonicotinoids, Personal biodiversity, Pollination, Rewilding, Tenerife, Urban biodiversity

5 responses to “Get a 30% discount if you pre-order my new book Pollinators & Pollination: Nature and Society

  1. Congrats, I hope to be able to purchase it. I would like some insight into our pollinators here in Southern Spain. We seemed to have a wild hive in the base of an olive tree. Later on we discovered bee hives at the top of a nearby hill, possibly for the chestnut flowers and local chestnut honey. The other bees from early spring seem to have disappeared. Best of luck with your book.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Pingback: “A che servono le vespe?” Beh, controllano pesti e impollinano pure! | Biologica Blog

  3. Pingback: Recent pollinator and pollination related research that’s caught my eye | Jeff Ollerton's Biodiversity Blog

  4. Pingback: Sì, anche vespe e calabroni possono impollinare | Biologica Blog

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