Another new garden pollinator record – Lunar Hornet Moth

Lunar Hornet Moth cropped

Following on from last week’s post about the Ashy Mining Bee, here’s yet another new record for our garden that I spotted yesterday – the Lunar Hornet Moth (Sesia bembeciformis), one of the Clearwing Moths (family Sesiidae).  It’s a fabulous example of Batesian Mimicry in which a harmless species (the moth) has evolved to resemble a more dangerous or toxic species, in this case large wasps or hornets.  I certainly had to look twice when I saw it!  

These moths do sometimes visit flowers such as umbellifers though the shot below is posed: the moth flew out of my hands as I was moving it and landed on this cultivated geranium.  The larvae feed on sallow and willow (Salix spp.) which we don’t have in the garden, but there’s lots in and around this part of the town.

Looking at the NBN Atlas account for the species I think that this may be a first record for Northampton town itself, though it is recorded out in the county.

Lunar Hornet Moth on GeraniumP1040014

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5 Comments

Filed under Biodiversity, Gardens, Moths, Urban biodiversity

5 responses to “Another new garden pollinator record – Lunar Hornet Moth

  1. It looks quite a frightening creature – maybe I won’t be so frightened, should I see one now!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Murtagh's Meadow

    Wow that looks amazing.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Matt

    My sister spotted this chap in her garden in souldern yesterday http://butterfly-conservation.org/51-10974/convolvulus-hawk-moth.html

    Liked by 1 person

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