The Altmetric Bookmarklet – an instant measure of the reach of academic publications [UPDATED]

Academics seem to be obsessed with metrics of all kinds at the moment, and I’m certainly not immune to it as my recent post on the h-index demonstrated.  So I was intrigued by a new (at least to me) browser plug-in that gives you instant altmetrics such as number of times mentioned on Twitter, Facebook or on news outlets, or cited in blogs, policy documents, Wikipedia, etc.  It’s called the Altmetrics Bookmarklet and can be downloaded (or rather dragged from the screen to the bookmark bar of your browser) from here.

I’ve given it a spin and it seems to do what it says it can do, within narrow publisher and time limits (2011 onward for Twitter, for instance).  It’s very, very simple.  Just find a paper that you are interested in, on the publisher’s official website; here’s a recent one by my colleagues Duncan McCollin and Robin Crockett – click on the Altmetric Bookmarklet (circled):

Altmetric 1

That gives you a drop-down of the current summary altmetrics for the paper which tells us it’s been tweeted by 14 people and mentioned on one Facebook page:

Altmetric 2

(As an experiment I’m going to see if it picks up this blog post once it’s live and will update below*).

If you select “Click for more details” you go to a new page that gives you…. more details:

Altmetric 3

And by selecting the different tabs you can see, for instance, exactly who has tweeted the paper:

Altmetric 4

It also gives you an altmetrics score for the paper (in this case 10) but it’s unclear to me how that’s calculated.  Does anyone know?

That’s all there is to it.  Is it possible to waste a lot of time playing around with this?  Yes.  Will it prove to be useful?  Only time will tell.  But it’s an interesting way of tracking the reach (and potential future impact) of your publications.

*UPDATE:  The Altmetric Bookmarklet had picked up the mention of the paper on this blog in less than 24 hours.

Advertisements

11 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized

11 responses to “The Altmetric Bookmarklet – an instant measure of the reach of academic publications [UPDATED]

  1. Miggie Pickton

    Hi Jeff
    The Altmetric score is based on the ‘attention’ a paper receives, weighted according to the source of that attention. So by default, a Facebook mention is worth 0.25, a tweet is worth 1, but if you get yourself into the news you get a bumper 8.
    All is explained here: http://support.altmetric.com/knowledgebase/articles/83337-how-is-the-altmetric-score-calculated

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Pingback: The Altmetric bookmarklet – a researcher view | Research Support Hub

  3. Hi Jeff, great post! You can find out more about the Altmetric Score and how’s it’s calculated here: http://support.altmetric.com/knowledgebase/articles/83337-how-is-the-altmetric-score-calculated

    Kind regards
    Catherine Williams

    Altmetric

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Thanks for the update. Science in action 🙂
    I took a look at link describing how they’ve set up the scoring system. They have anticipated some might attempt to game the system. I know, hard to believe a scientist might want to inflate their value metrics. Time will tell whether this metric will catch on. I might suggest if it does start to gain attention there will be those who will search out other ways to game the algorithm.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Interesting! The bookmark tool is very handy.

    Like

  6. Pingback: The biodiversity of the human family tree just got bigger | Jeff Ollerton's Biodiversity Blog

  7. Pingback: Pesticides and pollinators: some new studies and contrasting conclusions | Jeff Ollerton's Biodiversity Blog

  8. Reblogged this on fish thinkers and commented:
    I was thinking of writing a post about Altmetrics Bookmarklet after talking to a few people about how useful it is – however I don’t think I could do any better than Jeff Ollerton’s Biodiversity Blog post which is well written and concise. So I have re-blogged it below. The only thing I’d add for those that haven’t looked at Altmetrics before is that it isn’t necessary to download the bookmarklet to use it as many databases have a Altmetics tab next to each paper (for example Wiley online library).

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s